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Article
July 12, 1941

THE ASSOCIATION OF BACILLARY DYSENTERY AND INFECTIOUS JAUNDICE: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO EPIDEMIOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGIC CONTROL

Author Affiliations

BRANDON, VT.

JAMA. 1941;117(2):89-91. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820280011003

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Abstract

The association of bacillary dysentery and infectious jaundice in simultaneous epidemics is not a common occurrence. A survey of the literature reveals no mention of such a coincidence, although private conversations with general practitioners in Vermont have uncovered reports of minor seasonal (usually autumnal) epidemics of diarrhea with mild jaundice. Bacillary dysentery is a well known cause of serious epidemics of diarrheal disease in institutions, army camps and other places in which large numbers of persons exist in crowded, unsanitary conditions.

Late in October 1939, major outbreaks of diarrheal disease and infectious jaundice occurred at the Brandon State School, which is an institution of three hundred and eighty bed capacity caring for persons with mental deficiency in Vermont. During the period from October 1939 to July 1940, during which new cases were constantly appearing, the combined epidemics presented three distinct phases. The patients who contracted the disease early (October 17

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