[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.232.62.209. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 10, 1927

PREPARATION OF LACTIC ACID MILK MIXTURES FOR INFANT FEEDING

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine and the St. Louis Children's Hospital.

JAMA. 1927;89(11):862-863. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690110026008
Abstract

Whole undiluted lactic acid milk, enriched with commercial corn syrup, was originally introduced as a satisfactory food mixture for athreptic infants.1 A further experience, however, has led to the conclusion that such formulas are excellently adapted to the routine feeding of normal infants.2 The type of feeding described does not lead to gastro-intestinal disturbances, even in young and undernourished infants. The composition of the formula does not have to be changed during a large part of the first year, the infant merely being offered increasingly larger amounts of the same food mixture as he becomes older. The caloric value is high (from 25 to 30 calories an ounce), and because of this fact a smaller number of feedings during the day is necessary, and malnutrition due to underfeeding does not occur.

An experience of eight years with the feeding of several hundred infants in welfare clinics in practice

×