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Article
August 2, 1941

TREATMENT OF THE POSTENCEPHALITIC PARKINSONIAN SYNDROME: WITH DESICCATED WHITE WINE EXTRACT OF U. S. P. BELLADONNA ROOT

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI
From the Department of Internal Medicine, Neurologic Division, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1941;117(5):332-334. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820310004003
Abstract

Since the introduction of the "Bulgarian treatment" of postencephalitic parkinsonism by Raeff in 1926, numerous European and American investigators have confirmed the efficacy of this therapy in comparison with older methods of treatment.1 Attempts have also been made to determine what factors in the treatment are responsible for the clinical improvement commonly noted in patients receiving the "Bulgarian treatment."

The basis of this treatment is the root of the belladonna plant. It has been held by some investigators2 that the root of the belladonna plant indigenous to Bulgaria is therapeutically superior to roots grown elsewhere, but other investigators have denied this. Van Lehoczky3 found no difference between Bulgarian and Hungarian varieties. Alcock and Carmichael,4 Hill5 and Neuwahl6 found the English root as efficacious as the Bulgarian, and Vollmer7 found that extracts of the Bulgarian and the U. S. P. roots could be interchanged

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