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Article
September 17, 1927

BREAST FEEDING PROBLEMS: III. INFANTILE

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.

JAMA. 1927;89(12):945-947. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690120021007
Abstract

Arguments in favor of breast feeding are unnecessary except to revive waning enthusiasm. Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes wisely said that the two breasts of a woman can produce a baby food far superior to anything concoctable by the two hemispheres of the most learned professor's brain. Among infant foods, breast milk alone contains antibodies for human diseases.

Salge has shown that homologous proteins convey antitoxins from mother to child, and Moro has demonstrated a higher bactericidal power in the blood serum of breast fed infants.1 The clinical significance of these factors is shown by the studies of Wertheimer and Wolff,2 summarized in table 1.

These facts have been verified statistically in the Portland Infant Welfare Clinics, where breast feeding is especially emphasized. During the first three years of the clinics, among the 685 babies registered under 2 years of age, the mortality was 0.8 per cent, while the

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