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Article
August 9, 1941

TRICHINOSIS: REPORT OF NINETEEN CASES OF CLINICAL INFECTION AND TWENTY-ONE CASES OF ASYMPTOMATIC INFECTION

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Surgery, Mayo Foundation; ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Division of Medicine (Dr. Tillisch) and the Division of Clinical Pathology, Section on Parasitology (Dr. Magath), the Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1941;117(6):428-432. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820320020005
Abstract

Trichinosis, in spite of the fact that it is so old that it was known to the ancients, has assumed new interest in the light of many recent publications on the disease. This particular interest at present probably is the result of two factors: First, it has been claimed that in many cases trichinosis is undiagnosed by physicians and, second, it has been declared that the principal cause of the supposed increase in incidence of the disease is the ingestion by persons of meat from hogs fed on raw garbage. The first conception has been acquired through the numerous published results of routine necropsy performed at various public and private hospitals in the United States. These examinations have revealed that the percentage of infection varies from 3 to 28, depending on the geographic sector in which examinations are made.

What has not been sufficiently stressed, however, is the consideration that

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