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Article
September 24, 1927

PSYCHIC AND EMOTIONAL FACTORS IN GENERAL DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

JAMA. 1927;89(13):1013-1014. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690130001001
Abstract

A few months ago I saw a patient in an attack of acute abdominal pain so strongly suggesting an obstruction of the large bowel that a surgeon was called. This was at night. The pain had begun in the morning. By the time the surgeon arrived, the pain had subsided somewhat. It was therefore decided to wait before proceeding with any surgical measures. In the morning, when the patient was somewhat better, a fluoroscopy of the large bowel showed the barium filling the rectum and sigmoid to a point 14 inches above the sphincter, but it was impossible to make the barium pass any higher. Meanwhile, as the mass filled the bowel below this point, the patient complained bitterly of pain, which he said was of the same character and in the same part of the abdomen as that which he had had the day before. Several films were made,

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