[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 16, 1941

OCCULT FRACTURES

Author Affiliations

PROVIDENCE, R. I.; NEW HAVEN, CONN.

JAMA. 1941;117(7):500-504. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820330004002
Abstract

This paper has been written from the point of view of the practitioner who is forced to depend on inadequate facilities for roentgen ray diagnosis. In many otherwise excellent hospitals the visiting roentgenologist attends the hospital once a week and reads all the films taken during the previous week. During his absence the physician is obliged to depend on the diagnosis of a technician or on his own judgment.

We wish to emphasize the importance of the clinical examination for a suspected fracture in the face of a negative verdict by roentgen ray examination. Both examinations should be employed, but in case of doubt the clinical examination should prevail.

There is need of improved education of roentgen ray technicians, better training of the practitioners in the reading of roentgenograms and more cooperation between the physician and the roentgenologist.

The one surgical condition in which the roentgen ray examination as a

×