[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 16, 1941

REDUCTION OF GROWTH RATE IN GIGANTISM TREATED WITH TESTOSTERONE PROPIONATE

Author Affiliations

Grand Rapids, Mich.

JAMA. 1941;117(7):515-516. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.72820330002006a
Abstract

During the past five years several authors have suggested that there exists an antagonistic action between certain hormones and those of the pituitary. More specifically it was suggested by von Drigalski and Diethelm1 that the male sex hormone acts as a physiologic brake on the growth-producing hormone of the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland. They described the use of testosterone propionate in large doses in a case of hypophysial gigantism with rather uncertain effects of the treatment. It would seem that any decrease in the rate of growth would be due either to a decrease in the amount of growth-producing hormone of the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland or to an earlier closure of the epiphysial line. It was suggested by MacCullagh2 that testosterone propionate did not increase the rate of the epiphysial closure beyond normal.

The following is a report on the rate of growth in a case of

×