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April 12, 2016

Lifetime Perspectives on Primary Prevention of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Cardiology, Erasmus MC–University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
  • 2Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC–University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
  • 3Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas
  • 4Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas
  • 5Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois
 

Copyright 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.

JAMA. 2016;315(14):1449-1450. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.1654

Despite expanding primary prevention efforts, the majority of individuals will develop cardiovascular disease (CVD) during their lifetime.1,2 The discordance between short-term (10-year) and long-term (30-year to lifetime) cardiovascular risk is well established and is now reflected in the most recent clinical practice guidelines from the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) on lipid-lowering treatment for primary prevention of atherosclerotic CVD (ASCVD).3,4 Specifically, these guidelines recommend that lifetime risk estimation can be used as a communication strategy for adults younger than 60 years who are free of ASCVD and not candidates for lipid-lowering therapy. Although a high lifetime ASCVD risk has not been recommended as a class I indication for lipid-lowering treatment, the acknowledgment of lifetime risk in the guidelines indicates a more comprehensive awareness of the importance of prevention of ASCVD over a life span.

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