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Article
October 1, 1927

UNDIAGNOSED COUGH: A STUDY OF TWO HUNDRED PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

JAMA. 1927;89(14):1137-1140. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690140033010
Abstract

The present investigation was begun two years ago for the purpose of ascertaining whether an intensive study of a definite number of patients with chronic cough appearing for routine examination would not demonstrate active foci of tuberculosis in the guinea-pig when other methods, including examination of sputum, proved negative. The scope of this study entirely changed as the investigation proceeded, because we very soon became convinced, and so stated in our preliminary report1 in January, that sputum negative to tubercle bacilli would never produce positive lesions in the guinea-pig even though the physical and roentgen-ray examination showed fibrotic areas, tracheobronchial or hilum involvement.

This report on 100 patients, in addition, proved to our satisfaction that we were dealing with two main groups in which there was chronic cough: (1) a 34 per cent group which we named acute bronchitis and asthma, whose main etiologic factor was a preceding attack

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