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Article
August 30, 1941

MEDICAL EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA

JAMA. 1941;117(9):681-756. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820350021008
Abstract

THE MILITARY EMERGENCY AND THE MEDICAL PROFESSION 

A Statement by Major General James C Magee, Surgeon General, U. S. Army  In the present military emergency, the Medical Department of the Army must look for the greatly increased numbers of medical, dental and veterinary officers required for military service to the professions as established and practicing in civil life. That this fact has impressed itself with full force on the minds of the civilian members of the professions is attested by the many inquiries, proffers of service and suggestions directed toward a solution of the problems involved coming from all sections of the nation.The magnitude of the military effort demands the separation of thousands of practitioners from their accustomed occupations, and the same holds true of those who are engaged solely in administrative and instructional lines of endeavor. It is patent, in view of the administrative policies now applicable to the procurement of officer personnel whereby the choice of individuals for service is almost entirely restricted to those at present holding Reserve commissions, that certain dislocations will take place in communities and organizations that will be regarded as, and in fact will be, hardships to those concerned. A broadened base from which to draw officers for duty would of course serve to ameliorate the situation.

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