[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.193.85. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 8, 1927

THE ANTIRACHITIC ACTIVITY OF MONOCHROMATIC AND REGIONAL ULTRAVIOLET RADIATIONS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Pathological Laboratory, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the Research Laboratory of the Hanovia Chemical and Manufacturing Company, Newark, N. J.

JAMA. 1927;89(15):1222-1225. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690150032010
Abstract

In 1923, experiments were carried out to ascertain the length of the ultraviolet waves which are endowed with the remarkable property of preventing or curing rickets. It was found that, in order to be of value, "ultraviolet waves must have a length not longer than 302 or possibly 313 millimicrons."1 This conclusion was arrived at by means of an extended series of experiments which made use of selective glass filters and has been confirmed by the recent work of Luce.2 The study served to emphasize the remarkable specificity of waves of light in relation to rickets, showing that a difference of about 20 millionths of a millimeter determined whether ultraviolet radiation was either effective or ineffective in this respect. The data, however, were not sufficiently refined, the analysis of the spectrum not precise enough to warrant a definite conclusion as to whether the intense waves of the mercury

×