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Article
October 8, 1927

DEAD (PRESERVED) FASCIA GRAFTS FOR HERNIA REPAIR: CLINICAL RESULTS

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE
From the Surgery Department of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and University.

JAMA. 1927;89(15):1230-1235. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690150040012
Abstract

A little more than a year ago I published the results of a series of experiments on the use of dead fascia grafts for hernia repair.1 I here report the application to human beings of the principles established in animals. Before doing this it might be well to discuss again briefly just what is meant by dead grafts.

The attention of the medical world was first directed toward the subject of dead grafts in 1917 by the French worker Nageotte,2 who transplanted pieces of alcohol-preserved tendon to repair anatomic defects in the tendons of living animals. He found that the graft of dead tendon "took" just as well as grafts of living tendon, and on subsequent microscopic studies of the implanted dead graft he found that the histologic changes which took place were as follows: The dead cells of the graft were removed by the wandering cells of

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