[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 13, 1941

THE SMALL INTESTINE IN VITAMIN B DEFICIENCY

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Departments of Radiology of the Presbyterian Hospital and of Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

JAMA. 1941;117(11):913-917. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820370009004
Abstract

The association of abnormalities of the small intestine with nutritional disorders in which vitamin deficiency plays a part has been pointed out by a number of writers. Mackie1 in 1933 mentioned such abnormalities in a case of sprue. In a series of cases of "chronic steatorrhea" Snell and Camp2 in 1934 described dilatation, hypomotility and smoothing or exaggeration of the mucosal contours in this portion of the digestive tract, changes which were readily demonstrable by the use of a barium sulfate meal. Similar observations were made by Mackie and Pound3 (1935) in a series of cases of tropical sprue; by Mackie, Miller and Rhoads4 (1935) in ulcerative colitis; by Pendergrass and Comroe5 (1935) in a case in which there was chemical and clinical evidence of hypocalcemia, and by Golden6 (1936) in infantile celiac disease. Snell and Camp expressed the belief that these abnormalities of

×