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Article
September 20, 1941

THE GASTRIC MUCOSA OF CHRONIC ALCOHOLIC ADDICTS: A GASTROSCOPIC STUDY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Medicine, the University of Chicago.

JAMA. 1941;117(12):1005-1011. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820380027008
Abstract

The part that alcohol plays in producing acute gastritis has been known since 1833, when William Beaumont1 first described the "erythema and aphthous patches" and the mucopurulent exudates with blood-tinged red mucus that appeared in St. Martin's stomach after an alcoholic debauch. These observations were confirmed later by Saito,2 who instilled 50 per cent alcohol into the Pavlov pouch of a dog and observed the mucus and the inflammatory changes which resulted. Henning,3 Thomsen4 and Ostrouch5 described the microscopic structural changes which alcohol produced in the gastric epithelium of animals. Ebstein6 produced acute alcoholic gastritis in dogs and observed congestion, edema, hemorrhages and erosions of the mucosa. He found microscopic pathologic changes only in the chief cells of the gastric glands. Faber and Lange7 concluded from their pathologic studies that alcohol is an important factor in producing acute gastritis.

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