[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.238.190.122. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 27, 1941

THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TWO NEW TYPES OF CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC AGENTS IN MALARIA: SODIUM P,P′-DIAMINODIPHENYLSULFONE N,N′-DIDEXTROSESULFONATE (PROMIN) AND 2-SULFANILAMIDO PYRIMIDINE (SULFADIAZINE)

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK; Major, M. C., U. S. Army ANCON, CANAL ZONE

JAMA. 1941;117(13):1077-1081. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820390019006
Abstract

There is need for better antimalarial drugs because of certain fundamental deficiencies in quinine and atabrine. Although both are of great importance to the person with an acute attack of malaria, neither can be relied on to remove the infection completely, and for this reason their effect on malaria from a public health standpoint probably is minimal. In actual attempts to control malaria by the use of quinine, atabrine and plasmochin, the work of Clark, Komp and Jobbins1 stands out. They state: "Ten years of experience in attempting to control malaria in a number of endemic areas in Panama, by making monthly parasitic surveys, and treating the positives with drugs, leaves us with the impression that it is quite impossible to eradicate malaria parasites by these means or reduce them to a point where transmission is greatly reduced." In addition, not one of these drugs has a true prophylactic

×