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Article
March 14, 1931

BLADDER DIVERTICULA: WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO THEIR SURGICAL REMOVAL

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Michael Reese Hospital and the Edward Hines, Jr., Hospital.

JAMA. 1931;96(11):831-836. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02720370009003
Abstract

A diverticulum of the bladder is a cavity in closest relation to it produced by a localized dilatation of its wall. Diverticula are characterized by a definitely circumscribed opening which represents the connection between the cavity and the bladder, and by a mucous lining which is continuous with that of the bladder.

Vesical diverticula have been classified into various groups: congenital and acquired, true and false, solitary and multiple, and traction diverticula. They have been divided into those of the dome, of the lateral walls, and of the floor of the bladder.

Some authors have grouped these sacs as congenital and acquired, basing the division on the layers present. Klebs,1 Englisch2 and Rokitansky3 stated that the presence of all layers of the bladder wall designated a diverticulum of congenital origin, while in the acquired type there was merely a prolapse of the mucosa between the muscle fibers.

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