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Article
October 11, 1941

INFUSIONS OF BLOOD AND OTHER FLUIDS VIA THE BONE MARROW: APPLICATION IN PEDIATRICS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
Dr. O'Neill is a Ross V. Patterson Fellow.; From the Divisions of Hematology and Surgery of the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia and the Jefferson Medical College Hospital and the Charlotte Cardeza Foundation.

JAMA. 1941;117(15):1229-1234. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820410007002
Abstract

Substances injected into the marrow cavity are rapidly taken up,1 apparently unchanged, into the general circulation.2 The problem of administering fluids to infants is a difficult one, especially when rapid absorption is desired. The two main routes available, aside from the peripheral veins themselves, are the superior longitudinal sinus, reached through the anterior fontanel, and the peritoneal cavity. The infusion of substances through the anterior fontanel, unless in skilled hands, is attended by a high risk. The absorption of substances injected intraperitoneally may, under certain circumstances, be greatly delayed. Moreover, in treatment of disorders of the abdomen it is not advisable to use this route. Thus there is left a group of infants for whom infusion by the intramedullary route may be the only advisable resort. These considerations have led us to a trial of the merits of the intramedullary route for infusion of fluids in a group

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