[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.232.62.209. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 18, 1941

HERPES SIMPLEX FOLLOWING ARTIFICIAL FEVER THERAPY: SMALLPOX VACCINATION AS A FACTOR IN ITS PREVENTION

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, Division of Medicine, University of California Medical School.

JAMA. 1941;117(16):1327-1330. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820420019006
Abstract

This report is an analysis of the occurrence of herpes simplex1 as a complication of fever therapy. It is based on the records of 321 patients who were treated at the San Francisco Hospital and at the University of California Hospital.

Our purpose in this investigation is to determine whether the incidence of herpes is influenced by age, sex, disease or degree of the temperature induced during fever therapy, whether one attack of herpes protects against further attacks, what the relation is of individual susceptibility to the development of herpes and whether the incidence of herpes under these conditions is influenced by recent vaccination against smallpox.

REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE  Herpes is a common complication of pyrotherapy.2 In most patients the lesions appear twenty-four to thirty-six hours after the first treatment and heal in seven to ten days. The common sites are the lips, cheeks, eyelids and buccal

×