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Article
November 5, 1927

AN OUTBREAK OF GASTRO-ENTERITIS: MILK-BORNE EPIDEMIC AT DYERSBURG, TENN., CAUSED BY SALMONELLA SUIPESTIFER

Author Affiliations

Director, Division of Epidemiology; Director, Division of Laboratories, Tennessee State Department of Health NASHVILLE, TENN.
From the Tennessee State Department of Public Health.

JAMA. 1927;89(19):1584-1587. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690190022007
Abstract

Medical literature of recent years has contained an increasing number of articles dealing with outbreaks of gastro-enteritis. The articles deal with the etiologic agents, the symptomatology, the epidemiology, and the conveyers of the infectious agent. A variety of names have been given these outbreaks, and many organisms have been accused of being the cause of these conditions. This epidemic is described as an example of an outbreak of this kind, the vehicle being raw milk. Most of the outbreaks reported have shown the causative agent to be carried in some meat food. Nearly all epidemics which involve a large number of people show that milk has been the vector of the infectious agent.

SANITARY CONDITIONS IN DYERSBURG  Dyersburg is the county seat town of Dyer County. The Mississippi River borders the county on the west. Dyersburg is 75 miles northeast of Memphis. The census of 1920 gave the city a

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