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Article
October 18, 1941

SYPHILIS AMONG SELECTEES AND VOLUNTEERS: PREVALENCE IN FIRST MILLION MEN EXAMINED UNDER THE SELECTIVE SERVICE ACT OF 1940

Author Affiliations

Assistant Surgeon General, U. S. Public Health Service; Senior Statistician, Division of Venereal Diseases, U. S. Public Health Service WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1941;117(16):1350-1351. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820420042012

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Abstract

A rate of 45.2 cases of syphilis per thousand persons examined was found through physical examinations and routine serologic blood tests of the first million selectees and volunteers called for classification under the Selective Service Act of 1940. The examinations were made, and the blood specimens taken, by private physicians who volunteered their services to their local Selective Service boards. Nearly all of the men examined were between 21 and 35 years of age.

The physicians examined the selectees clinically for lesions of early syphilis and other evidence of the disease. The blood specimens were examined routinely in state and municipal laboratories or in laboratories designated by the state departments of health.

Standard quadruplicate reporting forms were adopted in the District of Columbia and all the states except Idaho, Kentucky, Oregon and Vermont. One of the forms was retained by the testing laboratory, one was returned to the examining physician

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