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Article
October 18, 1941

DIABETES AND CEREBRAL NEOPLASM: A CASE OF SEVERE CONVULSIVE ATTACKS SIMULATING INSULIN SHOCK

Author Affiliations

Providence, R. I.

JAMA. 1941;117(16):1352-1353. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.72820420002013a

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Abstract

Convulsions often accompany hypoglycemic reactions in patients with severe diabetes. In the case here reported severe convulsive seizures which appeared to be preventable by allowing a high blood sugar to be maintained were due, it appears, not to the occurrence of hypoglycemia as at first supposed but apparently to the presence of edema in the tissues adjacent to a cerebral tumor, which edema could be for a time prevented by the general dehydration incident to allowing the diabetes to remain uncontrolled.

M. R. W., an unmarried woman who was 70 years old at the time of her death in January 1940, was first seen in the Rhode Island Hospital in April 1926. She had been in coma for four hours. With the use of insulin and intravenous fluids she made a good recovery. At that time she was known to have had diabetes for six years but had not kept

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