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Article
November 5, 1927

MODIFIED MEASLES: THE USE OF CONVALESCENT BLOOD FROM A "FAMILY DONOR"

JAMA. 1927;89(19):1601. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690190039011
Abstract

The production of modified measles by convalescent serum or whole blood injections presents several problems of interest to the physician in general practice. Convalescent serum is not easily obtained except during epidemics and in large cities. Epidemics tend to recur at three year intervals, necessitating a new supply of serum for each epidemic. Except in child-caring institutions, donors for convalescent blood are difficult to find; and unless municipal health departments follow the example of the New York City Board of Health in obtaining measles serum for distribution, the physician in private practice faces a real problem in his responsibility to his young patients at the beginning of a measles epidemic. Commercial animal serum preparations may soon be available, but it is doubtful whether these will meet with general favor on account of the possibilty of undesirable serum reactions. Whole blood injections from adults who have had measles months or years

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