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Article
October 25, 1941

INTRACEREBRAL CLOT COMPLICATING ECLAMPSIA WITHOUT CONVULSIONS: SURGICAL REMOVAL OF CLOT WITH RECOVERY

Author Affiliations

Des Moines, Iowa
From the Department of Neurosurgery, Iowa Methodist Hospital.

JAMA. 1941;117(17):1439-1440. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.72820430001009
Abstract

Eclampsia is a clinical entity which is not satisfactorily defined from either an etiologic or a pathologic point of view. Williams1 states that eclampsia is an acute toxemia usually but not always accompanied by convulsions. However, De Lee2 remarks that this condition is not a disease but merely a symptom of some underlying cause, and he further mentions that cerebral hemorrhages of varying size frequently occur in eclampsia with this finding present in 40 per cent of autopsy material. Slemons3 in 1907 reviewed the literature to that date and Liebmann4 in 1925 quoted Schmorl's definition of eclampsia as "degenerative kidney changes, particularly in the convoluted tubules where albumin and fatty alterations are observed: necrosis in the liver with thrombosis in the interlobular and intralobular vessels; degeneration in the heart, particularly in the muscles; hemorrhage and softening into the brain; and a widespread thrombosis in the internal

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