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Article
November 12, 1927

FRACTURES OF THE LOWER EXTREMITY OF THE RADIUS: DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

Author Affiliations

Professor of Clinical Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons NEW YORK

JAMA. 1927;89(20):1683-1685. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690200035011
Abstract

Any one who has fallen on his outstretched hand or experienced a backfire in cranking a car, and who has localized tenderness over the lower portion of the radius with some disability at the wrist, may be considered to have a fracture until it has been proved to the contrary. Many fractures of the lower portion of the radius do not present deformity immediately after the injury, and there may be little or no spontaneous pain. If such injuries are diagnosed and treated as sprains or contusions, the fragments may be easily displaced subsequently.

In eliciting localized tenderness it is well to allow the patient himself to press over the suspected area, with the end of a finger, pen or the rubber end of a pencil. There is much less fear and defense reaction if the patient does this himself. Moreover, after he has tried it, he is more apt

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