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Article
November 12, 1927

THE INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC OF 1918: II: PREVENTIVE MEASURES

JAMA. 1927;89(20):1689-1693. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.92690200001013
Abstract

A. ISOLATION AND QUARANTINE  It was shown in the 1890 pandemic, and reaffirmed by universal experience in 1918, that influenza is spread by human agency (p. 257). It follows that in pandemic times the prevention of contact with infected human beings affords protection against infection. This is illustrated by the experience of many institutions in which a more or less rigorous quarantine prevented the introduction of influenza at a time when the community round about was suffering severely. The advent of influenza in the large state institutions in New York, regardless of their geographic situation, was considerably retarded, presumably because of relative isolation. "The first death in them certified as due to influenza occurred on October 10, or about twenty-three days after the epidemic had already definitely begun in the rest of the state" (Eichel 1923).At the lakeville State Sanatorium for Tuberculosis in Massachusetts none of the patients or

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