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Article
November 1, 1941

THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF MILD VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES: A CLINICAL DISCUSSION

Author Affiliations

Associate Professor of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine DURHAM, N. C.
From the Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1941;117(18):1493-1496. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820440001001
Abstract

The recognition of a full blown vitamin deficiency such as acute pellagra, beriberi with peripheral neuritis, ariboflavinosis, scurvy and rickets is relatively simple. The characteristic dermatitis, the appearance of the gums, mouth and tongue, the cheilosis, the keratitis, the mental confusion or delirium, the diarrhea and the paresthesias of the extremities constitute a picture familiar to all and need no elaboration. It is now generally accepted that an easily recognizable clinical picture results from an advanced deficiency of the following vitamins: A, B1 (thiamine hydrochloride), nicotinic acid, riboflavin, C (ascorbic acid), D and K.1 While a number of other vitamins have been identified, there is still some doubt that their deficiency produces a characteristic syndrome in man.

In recent years many excellent communications2 dealing with deficiencies of the B complex have appeared. It has been shown also by numerous observers that single vitamin deficiencies rarely if ever

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