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Article
November 1, 1941

TREATMENT OF NEUROPSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS WITH VITAMINS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Medical Service of the Psychiatric Division, Bellevue Hospital, and the Department of Medicine, New York University College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1941;117(18):1496-1502. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820440004002
Abstract

During the past decade vitamin deficiency has been looked for and often found in many neuropsychiatric disorders. It must be emphasized, however, that merely finding a vitamin deficiency concurrent with a disease does not indicate that this deficiency is the cause of the original disease. Secondary or "conditioned" vitamin deficiencies should be clearly distinguished from the original or primary disease, else utter confusion will result.

Almost every vitamin has also been credited with playing a role in the maintenance of a normal nervous system. The more important of the vitamins thus accredited are thiamine hydrochloride, nicotinic acid, riboflavin, pyridoxine and alpha-tocopherol. Only thiamine hydrochloride and nicotinic acid, however, have been related clinically in a definite causal role to neuropsychiatric syndromes in man.

The sequence of events in a vitamin deficiency disease begins with an inadequate vitamin supply, due to failure to ingest, absorb or utilize, followed in succession by tissue

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