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Article
November 26, 1927

CEREBROSPINAL FLUID PRESSURE: CRITICAL EXAMINATION OF MENSURATION METHODS AND DESCRIPTION OF A NEW INSTRUMENT

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Department of Medicine, University of California Medical School.

JAMA. 1927;89(22):1856-1860. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690220032009
Abstract

Efforts to advance the science of medicine in later years have made ever increasing use of measurements1 —a trend which is natural and important and which has occurred before in the development of other sciences. But our science, unlike some of the others, as a rule does not permit a high degree of accuracy in its measurements; and we, familiar with inexactness, while sensing the need for quantitative knowledge, have too often been content with needlessly crude methods. Or, what is worse, a crude method is employed, its crudity ignored and its results assumed to be accurate. Extensive clinical application of a measuring device has quite commonly preceded any adequate investigation of the magnitude of its errors. This has been true of blood pressure determinations,2 and is also true of measurements of cerebrospinal fluid pressure.

Any one who has watched fluid spurt from a lumbar puncture needle when

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