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Article
December 3, 1927

THE INFLUENCE OF WAR SURGERY ON TREATMENT OF FRACTURES IN GREAT BRITAIN

JAMA. 1927;89(23):1920-1924. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690230004002
Abstract

In order to assess the influence of the late war on the treatment of fractures in Great Britain, it is necessary to consider what was the state of affairs before the war. In the nineties, and in the first decade of the present century, the vast new fields of surgery which opened up—made possible by the work of Pasteur and Lister—had attracted surgeons so largely that the treatment of fractures had been allowed to fall into the background. There was so much to discover, so much that was new, that the incentive for a man to put his best efforts into the field of abdominal surgery was very real.

There can be no doubt, looking back to this time, that fractures were neglected by the generality of surgeons, and this of necessity was reflected in the paucity of the teaching. The discovery of roentgen rays in 1895 had to a

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