[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 3, 1927

STUDIES ON THE EFFECTS OF ABUNDANT CEREAL INTAKE: II. THE USE OF SUPPLEMENTS OTHER THAN MILK

JAMA. 1927;89(23):1930-1932. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690230014005
Abstract

There is a current tendency in nutrition to emphasize the importance of milk as a supplement to cereal.1 Rose2 cites as one reason "why we eat cereals" that "they are good carriers of milk." The advantages of cereal and milk combinations are easily demonstrable and deserve emphasis.

There are some aspects of the cereal-and-milk problem, however, which do not seem to have received much experimental consideration. Certain groups of the world's population do not have access to much milk. In China, for example, milk is available in only small amounts. Cereal, chiefly rice, constitutes the dominant staple food and furnishes from 66 to 72 per cent of the calories of the average Chinese ration according to the estimations of Adolph3 and Wu.4 This great abundance of cereal certainly does not function as a carrier of milk, as is the case in the United States. If one

×