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Article
December 3, 1927

MENTAL SYMPTOMS IN RELATION TO GENERAL MEDICINE

JAMA. 1927;89(23):1944-1948. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690230028009
Abstract

Every physician faces the problem of dealing with mental symptoms in his patients. Mental symptoms are of very frequent occurrence. They may arise in the course of any disease process. Not infrequently cases appear in which a morbid mental state constitutes the essential etiologic soil out of which the somatic, or bodily, symptoms arise. On the other hand, organic disease is constantly giving rise to emotional or mental reactions. On whichever basis they may arise, much of the mental symptomatology commonly encountered can be interpreted by the general medical practitioner.

The general physician often hesitates to deal with mental conditions, although he attacks with confidence problems of equally obscure organic, serologic or bacterial origin. For example, the clinician makes use of the technical researches of the specialist in cardiorenal disorders, or of the biochemist in diabetes, or of the endocrinologist in the use of complicated ductless gland therapy. One reason

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