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Article
November 29, 1941

THE VALUE OF PHYSICAL THERAPY IN INTERNAL MEDICINE

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1941;117(22):1835-1839. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820480001001
Abstract

It may be stated with little fear of contradiction that there is no field of therapeutics less understood and less frequently employed by internists than physical therapy. There are several reasons that account for this unfortunate state of affairs which has its inception in our medical schools. A survey of the curriculums of undergraduate as well as graduate medical courses reveals the fact that, if taught at all, but little time is devoted to the various aspects of physical therapy and that at best the courses available to students of medicine are inadequate and superficial. The average physician, therefore, approaches the practice of medicine knowing little about one of the oldest and most useful branches of therapeutics. Physicians, as a rule, because of their lack of understanding, evince little interest in acquiring a sound working knowldege of physical therapy. Furthermore, the proper application of physical therapeutic methods requires not only

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