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Article
November 29, 1941

THE PROGNOSIS OF ACUTE HEMORRHAGIC NEPHRITIS IN CHILDHOOD

Author Affiliations

STATEN ISLAND, N. Y.; NEW YORK
From the Pediatric Department of the New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital of Columbia University.

JAMA. 1941;117(22):1855-1858. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820480021005
Abstract

Various divergent opinions of the prognosis of acute hemorrhagic nephritis in children have been explained on geographic regional variations, variations in the general health of the individual at and after the acute attack, different interpretations of observations, and many other bases. Until the obvious procedure of establishing minimum criteria for a healed kidney is utilized and is used uniformly in all studies, this controversy will continue.

Great variations in the evaluation of the prognosis of nephritis do occur when different investigators apply different standards of normalcy. The criteria used in previous studies fall generally into three groups (a) those which employ physical examinations, blood pressures and routine urinalysis1 (table 1), (b) those which include one or more renal function tests2 (table 2), and (c) those which include the quantitative examination of concentrated urine (Addis count3) with renal function tests done as a routine or whenever indicated4

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