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Article
December 20, 1941

THE "ANOXEMIA TEST" AS AN INDEX OF THE CORONARY RESERVE: SERIAL OBSERVATIONS ON ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SEVEN PATIENTS WITH THEIR APPLICATION TO THE DETECTION AND CLINICAL COURSE OF CORONARY INSUFFICIENCY

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the Medical Clinic of the Presbyterian Hospital.

JAMA. 1941;117(25):2113-2119. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820510001001
Abstract

The "anoxemia test," together with its clinical applications and limitations, has already been described in detail.1 In principle it consists of permitting the patient to breathe a mixture of 10 per cent oxygen and 90 per cent nitrogen for twenty minutes or until cardiac pain appears. Measurements of electrocardiograms taken at intervals during this period reveal in patients with a diminished coronary reserve characteristic changes which are not observed in the presence of an adequate coronary blood flow. The occurrence of pain during the test has not been stressed as a diagnostic feature, because it represents a subjective reaction. In this respect, the present study appears to call for a modification in the point of view. The observations here reported were designed to furnish information concerning the value of a series of tests done over a period of time on the same patients, with particular reference to the diagnosis

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