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Article
December 24, 1927

THE RECTAL ADMINISTRATION OF ETHER AND OIL AND MORPHINE, MAGNESIUM SULPHATE AND ETHER IN SURGERY AND OBSTETRICS: Report to the Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry

Author Affiliations

Professor of Pharmacology, Cornell University Medical College; Member of Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry NEW YORK
From the Department of Pharmacology, Cornell University Medical College.

JAMA. 1927;89(26):2189-2193. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.92690260003012a
Abstract

II. So-Called Synergistic Analgesia  Gwathmey's method of inducing anesthesia by the rectal administration of ether in oil following the administration of morphine sulphate was not adopted generally. In 1921, in a paper entitled "Synergistic Colonic Analgesia," Gwathmey11 said:We propose now to introduce another element into colonic anesthesia, which will render expert supervision unnecessary. . . . It is termed synergistic analgesia. By synergism is meant the reciprocal augmentation of the action of one drug by that of another. This effect is not due to a simple summation of similar pharmacologic actions, for they are altogether too great. . . . At the Presbyterian Hospital it has been definitely determined that the addition of a small amount of magnesium sulphate to the usual hypodermic of morphine increases the value of the hypodermic from 50 to 100 per cent. We propose to take advantage of the knowledge thus gained and

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