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Article
April 18, 1931

THE INDISPENSABLE USES OF NARCOTICS: IN THE PRACTICE OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY

JAMA. 1931;96(16):1302-1303. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.27220420001010
Abstract

Narcotics employed for various purposes in otolaryngology are, first, morphine and codeine derived from opium; second, cocaine from erythroxylon coca, and, last, scopolamine. The manufacture of heroin from morphine was discontinued some years ago because of the habit forming tendencies displayed by individuals using that drug. It was most valuable in controlling annoying and persistent coughs, particularly those of tracheal and bronchial origin. So far as the indispensable character of the opium preparations is concerned, I do not find it necessary to use morphine very extensively. With reference to tonsillectomy under general anesthesia in adults, the hypodermic use of ⅙ grain (11 mg.) of morphine sulphate with 1/150 grain (0.4 mg.) of atropine is of value in that the former lessens the excitement and fright stage before anesthesia is established and the latter diminishes the secretions in the mouth and throat. When children are of an especially excitable type, it

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