[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 28, 1942

AVOIDANCE OF DEGENERATIVE LESIONS IN DIABETES MELLITUS

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY
From the Departments of Pediatrics and of Ophthalmology, State University of Iowa College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1942;118(9):694-696. doi:10.1001/jama.1942.02830090012003
Abstract

Maintenance of life is not sufficient in itself as a goal in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Insulin has made it easy for the patient with diabetes to survive. Therapy with insulin has such a broad zone of safety that its use tends to encourage a policy of laissez faire on the part of the patient and of the physician. Degenerative changes frequently develop in the diabetic patient who has been led to think that the management of his disease has been adequate. Because of this fact, confusion has arisen as to the essential cause of the sequelae of diabetes mellitus; are they inherent in the disease itself or do they reflect inadequacies in the level of control maintained throughout short or long intervals of the diabetic patient's life?

To make an adequate appraisal of the part played by the disease itself as distinguished from conditions imposed by its noncontrol,

×