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Article
February 18, 1928

ENTEROCOCCUS PERITONITIS: REPORT OF CASE IN A CHILD

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.
From the Department of Pediatrics and Infectious Diseases, University of Michigan Medical School.

JAMA. 1928;90(7):518-520. doi:10.1001/jama.1928.02690340020007
Abstract

Parenteral infections with the enterococcus appear to have been rarely recognized in this country, and American bacteriologists are inclined to doubt the pathogenicity of this organism.

In 1899, Thiercelin1 described an organism which he considered a normal inhabitant of the human gastrointestinal tract. The germ was somewhat pleomorphic, sometimes appearing as a lanceolate diplococcus like the pneumococcus and sometimes as a "streptodiplococcus" looking like chains of diplococci. He found this organism in small numbers in normal stools but it became very abundant in certain intestinal diseases, such as mucous colitis. This author also isolated the organism from pus from the meninges in two cases of epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis. He found it in pus from suppurating appendicitis. He named the germ Enterococcus.

Houston and McCloy,2 working in an English base hospital in 1916, found the enterococcus in a variety of conditions which they classified into three groups of cases.

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