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Article
April 11, 1942

VERTIGO DUE TO OBSTRUCTION OF THE EUSTACHIAN TUBES: A CLINICAL STUDY BASED ON ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-FIVE CASES

JAMA. 1942;118(15):1282-1284. doi:10.1001/jama.1942.02830150018006
Abstract

Vertigo caused by obstruction of the eustachian tubes is a distinct clinical entity which has received but scant attention both in the literature and in practice. My own experience in the treatment of 135 cases of this type has proved that many patients suffer unnecessarily the distressing symptoms of vertigo, nausea and vomiting, sometimes for long periods, because their physicians fail to recognize the cause and to institute the simple procedure of mechanical inflation of the eustachian tubes which would bring them relief.

The reason these cases are so consistently overlooked probably is that they are seen usually by the medical man or general practitioner, who is likely to think in terms of disturbances in the digestive, circulatory or nervous systems and hence to ignore the possibility that violent symptoms of dizziness, nausea and vomiting may be attributable to stenosis of the eustachian tubes.

Most of the references to vertigo

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