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Article
April 7, 1928

MUSEUM FATIGUE

JAMA. 1928;90(14):1120. doi:10.1001/jama.1928.02690410032014
Abstract

One of the objects of scientific management, the designation given to the modern system of organizing and conducting industrial work, has been to devise methods by which excessive industrial fatigue can be avoided. Bodily fatigue has been shown to have an unmistakable effect on industrial output, so that for economic reasons, if for no other, the condition referred to has called forth intensive study. Investigators have frequently maintained that in industrial work there is an interrelation between fatigue and the health of the workers. Lee1 has pointed out that fatigue in the individual has its subjective and its objective aspects and hence may be considered from the two points of view of the psychic and the physical. After he has been active mentally or physically, the average man "feels" tired; that is, to him fatigue is a matter of sensation, and his sensations are the sole measure of his

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