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Article
May 26, 1928

OPERABILITY IN CANCER: STATISTICAL STUDY OF ONE THOUSAND CASES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Pathological Laboratory, St. Luke's Hospital.

JAMA. 1928;90(21):1690-1692. doi:10.1001/jama.1928.02690480012005

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Abstract

The rising recorded death rate from cancer is a definite evidence that treatment of the disease is as yet very defective. Granted that this increase in the death rate is largely due to improved diagnosis, it would seem reasonable to assume that such improvement in diagnosis should detect a larger number of operable cases and thus afford better material for treatment. Obviously, this is not the case. On the other hand, statistical

studies of large series of treated patients are now available showing very good results in certain types of cancer, such as those of the skin, breast, uterus and lip; yet the death rates in these favorable sites are not falling. Is this due to incompetent treatment by the physicians of the country or to the fact that the material is hopeless from the start? Are not the favorable statistical collections from selected groups of patients, and are they

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