[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.204.55.168. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 9, 1935

A SUCCESSFUL METHOD FOR VACCINATION AGAINST ACUTE ANTERIOR POLIOMYELITIS: FURTHER REPORT

Author Affiliations

Professor of Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, and Director of the Research Institute of Cutaneous Medicine; Resident in Medicine, Temple University Hospital; PHILADELPHIA
From Temple University School of Medicine and the Research Institute of Cutaneous Medicine of Philadelphia.

JAMA. 1935;104(6):456-460. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760060024006
Abstract

As recently stated by Kolmer and Rule,1 it is possible to vaccinate Macacus rhesus monkeys safely and successfully against acute anterior poliomyelitis with subcutaneous and intracutaneous injections of vaccines of living but attenuated virus composed of 4 per cent suspensions of poliomyelitic monkey spinal cord in sterile 1 per cent solutions of sodium ricinoleate. All of a series of eighteen monkeys were immunized sufficiently without the slightest evidences of ill effects to protect them completely against infection following the intracerebral injection of about eighteen minimal infective doses of virus given under ether anesthesia about one month after the last dose of vaccine, the disease developing in unvaccinated controls in from five to nine days after inoculation.

Following these observations, two of us received subcutaneous injections of 0.5, 1.5 and 2 cc. of the vaccine at intervals of five days without any ill effects whatever except local reactions at the

×