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Article
June 9, 1928

THE ARREST OF DENTAL CARIES IN CHILDHOOD

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY
From the Department of Pediatrics, State University of Iowa College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1928;90(23):1867-1869. doi:10.1001/jama.1928.02690500029007
Abstract

Dental caries may be properly considered as a disease of childhood, susceptibility at this age period being almost universal. In surveys of school children it is unusual to find a mouth free from caries. The average child will have seven or more affected teeth in various stages of destruction. The rate of progress of the carious process and the number of teeth involved varies with the individual. As the child approaches maturity, retardation of destruction becomes evident. In some instances active caries may become arrested spontaneously during childhood. The factors involved in the inactivation have not been understood, nor have many instances been recorded.

The etiology of dental caries is a subject of controversy. It is generally conceded that a break in the continuity of the enamel is a primary requisite. The exposed dentin thus becomes susceptible to attack by external agencies. Any factor leading to enamel defects will thus

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