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Article
February 23, 1935

CHANGES IN THE GASTRO-INTESTINAL TRACT IN DEFICIENCY STATES: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE SMALL INTESTINE: A ROENTGENOLOGIC AND CLINICAL STUDY OF FORTY CASES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Departments of Roentgenology and Medicine, the Fifth Avenue Hospital, the New York Hospital, and the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Cornell University Medical College.

JAMA. 1935;104(8):613-618. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760080009003
Abstract

Deficiency disease may result from a defective dietary or from abnormal physiology of the gastro-intestinal tract. Defective absorption constitutes one of the outstanding features of sprue and in certain cases has been shown to condition the development of the deficiency factors of the disease.1 This occurs without extensive pathologic changes in the structure of the small intestine apart from atrophy that is not disproportionate to the general wasting of the body and the viscera.2 We have observed advanced deficiency disease in several severe cases of ulcerative colitis. This suggested the possibility of a similar mechanism and led to the detailed clinical and radiologic investigation of a large group of cases of chronic ulcerative colitis.

Evidence of deficiency states was found in 63 per cent of seventy-five cases studied. These conditions have presented the characteristics of partial deprivation of certain vitamins, of protein, and of important inorganic elements. The

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