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Article
March 2, 1935

THE DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF THE LEUKEMIC STATES: WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO THE IMMATURE CELL TYPES

Author Affiliations

EMORY UNIVERSITY,. GA.
From the Department of Pathology and Bacteriology, Emory University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1935;104(9):697-702. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760090001001
Abstract

A thorough knowledge of hematopoiesis is essential for a careful differentiation of the various types of leukemia. No longer are these dyscrasias considered "diseases of the blood" but rather dysfunctions of hematopoietic tissues.1 Until the second decade of the twentieth century with the work of Reschad and Schilling-Torgau2 and others, there were recognized only two types of leukemia: myeloid, arising in the bone marow, and lymphatic, having its origin in the lymphoid tissue. The recognition of a third type of leukemia involving the monocytic series of cells has engendered new ideas concerning the origin and classification of blood cells.3 As a result of this stimulus, many conflicting theories have arisen.

PRESENT CONCEPTION OF HEMATOPOIESIS  Investigators are in accord only in a single concept— that all blood cells have their origin from the mesenchymal cell of the mesodermal layer in the embryo.4 From this point, opinions diverge

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