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Article
March 16, 1935

PEPTIC ESOPHAGITIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Medical Department, Mount Sinai Hospital.

JAMA. 1935;104(11):906-909. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760110034008
Abstract

The causes of esophagitis are usually given as follows:

  1. Irritative (mechanical, thermal and chemical irritants, including alcohol and tobacco).

  2. Specific (syphilis, tuberculosis, actinomycosis).

  3. Secondary as a complication of (a) cardiospasm, (b) diverticula or (c) neoplasms.

Recently I have observed some patients with a type of esophagitis that does not seem to fit into this classification. The features of these cases are so distinctive as to impress one with the probability that they form a separate clinical entity. They are, therefore, presented for consideration.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.—  S. P., a man, aged 77, for three years had complained of typical symptoms of duodenal ulcer; viz., late hunger pains, some nausea and sour vomiting. He presented a deformed duodenal bulb radiographically. This attack was relieved by a Sippy regimen. Three months later the symptoms of duodenal ulcer returned. In addition he complained of dysphagia with lower substernal

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