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Article
April 27, 1935

PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASE: ITS SIGNIFICANCE FOR GENERAL PRACTITIONERS AND SPECIALISTS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Surgery, University of Illinois School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1935;104(17):1463-1467. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760170001001
Abstract

It is no exaggeration to say that thousands of individuals are unconscious or mildly conscious of a Progressive interference with their peripheral circulation. Their feet may be pulseless but still in a stage of compensation. Their margin of safety is minimal. Their "rheumatic" pains come and go with changes of weather, mechanical stress or emotional load. An occasional numbness or tingling of the extremities is disregarded. They undergo an annual or semiannual physical examination during which peripheral circulation is ignored, although the heart is carefully examined, chest plates are taken and electrocardiograms are read. Insurance examinations may be made or physical examinations when they apply for a new job, but nobody palpates the pedal pulses.

As a result, the middle aged wage earner, the insured policyholder, or the railroad or street car conductor suddenly develops a serious interference with the peripheral blood flow. Did this really come out of a

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