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Article
January 9, 1943

THE PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED IN INDUSTRIAL ESTABLISHMENTS OF THE GOVERNMENT: POSSIBILITIES FOR THEIR INCREASED PLACEMENT

Author Affiliations

Medical Director, U. S. Civil Service Commission; Assistant to Medical Director, U. S. Civil Service Commission WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1943;121(2):100-107. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840020008003
Abstract

Under the necessity of compensating for wartime manpower shortages, the U. S. Civil Service Commission, central recruiting agency of the federal government, has conducted studies which show that thousands of jobs in industrial establishments of the government, such as arsenals and navy yards, can be filled by judicious placement of physically handicapped persons.

A valuable source of manpower is thus opened up, because many of the jobs considered in the studies have thus far been open only to persons with all their faculties.

Out of the effort to determine what positions in the federal service may be filled by physically handicapped persons and to encourage federal appointing officers to appoint these persons, when practicable, in their respective agencies a medical function of major proportions has developed. It is being performed by the commission's medical division as a special aspect of the regular function of devising minimum physical requirements for positions

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