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Article
January 30, 1943

A MILK BORNE EPIDEMIC OF BRUCELLOSIS: CAUSED BY THE PORCINE TYPE OF BRUCELLA (BRUCELLA SUIS) IN A RAW MILK SUPPLY

Author Affiliations

Associate Director, State Hygienic Laboratory IOWA CITY; Medical Director, District Health Service No. 3 LE MARS, IOWA; MARCUS, IOWA; Milk Sanitarian, State Department of Health; Epidemiologist, State Department of Health DES MOINES, IOWA

JAMA. 1943;121(5):319-322. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840050017005
Abstract

Brucellosis of man, or undulant fever, is nearly always of sporadic occurrence. Animals chiefly concerned in the spread of infection are the cow, the hog and the goat. Organisms ordinarily causing infectious (contagious) abortion in these animals are respectively the bovine (Brucella abortus), the porcine (Brucella suis) and the caprine (Brucella melitensis) strains of Brucella. Infection in the cow is also known as Bang's disease and in the hog as Traum's disease. Although the possibility of occurrence of infection traceable to the goat needs to be kept in mind, the bovine and porcine strains of Brucella are probably the main offenders in most areas of the United States.

Main modes of conveyance of brucellosis to man are (1) through direct contact with infected animals or their abortion products and (2) through use of raw dairy products from infected sources. Brucellosis may occur in epidemic form when raw milk is consumed

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